From $160.00/person

Down by the Bay

Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia

Our day together we experience part of the Annapolis Valley region, where we will explore the coast of the world famous Bay of Fundy. Here we have the chance to see the world’s highest tides, flocks of seabirds and rugged sea cliffs. From towering volcanic sea cliffs near black in color to the red sandstone seabed of the Minas Basin, the sea here not only provides incredible scenery, but creates a diverse marine ecosystem which is home to an abundance of sea-life which provides a lucrative living for many families along its coast. If the tides play in our favor we will have the chance to walk on the ocean floor in search of precious rocks, sea shells and lost pirate treasure.

Back on land, the farming community here is alive and well! At the Farmers Market we mingle with locals selling their goods in the form of precious hand made delicacies, locally produced wines, art and fresh produce. Various local musicians frequent the market to entertain and set the scene for a welcoming community supported venue. We end the day with a visit to the Luckett Vineyards for a taste of some of Nova Scotia’s finest wines and one breathtaking view overlooking the Gaspereau Valley and the Bay of Fundy on the horizon.

  • Easy Overall Difficulty
  • (8:30am-4:30pm) Tour Length
  • 2.0 km Walking Distance
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About Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia

The Annapolis Valley measures approximately 126 km in length from Digby and the Annapolis Basin in the west to Wolfville and the Minas Basin in the east. This is Nova Scotia’s premier agricultural center. Particularly famous for its apple crops, the valley hosts in excess of 1,000 farms of various types, the majority being relatively small family-owned operations and now vineyards; yes this is Nova Scotia wine country.

The Bay of Fundy has the highest tides in the world, and those enormous tides alone make the Bay of Fundy one of the world’s greatest natural wonders. The height of the tide can reach an incredible 16 meters (53ft).Twice daily the Bay of Fundy fills and empties 100 billion tons of sea water during each tide cycle—that’s more than the flow of all the world’s freshwater rivers combined.